Portraits is a field which I always loved to venture into, yet I never had much intuitive approach with my sitters.

In most cases I just let them sit and pose however they want and I would focus on not mucking things up by checking my gears in place and take in the required light readings. I suppose it’s something I would (need?) to learn, but why pretend if I don’t enjoy it?

It’s not like I don’t like talking to people, but I spend most of the time listening rather than initiate conversation, or just point out subject of interest with others and almost shut down soon after few exchange of words.

What I began to realised was I enjoyed staying next to my camera; sitting or standing, gazing towards what I see and move around if both of us (me and the camera) agree if that is the way of looking at it (the subject). It’s a ritual which I always do when I make images from landscape and of things that just don’t move: old buildings, objects, and such.

I suppose to learn would be to work with the one I know best and she knows how I work without the need to explain more.

My partner and wife, Anis Ramzi, agreed to work with me as my sitter and I don’t have to reward her with ice-cream soon after (see my daughter’s article here).

Anis Ramzi, Portrait study, November 2014

Though I prefer the second plate, which she felt more relaxed, which would be obvious as she leaned back and with less rigid posture. Though the plate was slightly warped in the centre, and causing the out of focus. Plus, it looks like I need to run another sunning the silver bath again soon… Yet the plate is what is it and that’s all I had for the day.

Ans Ramzi, Portrait Study no.2, November 2014

 

 

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