CDVWhile rummaging through piles of various odd projects which needs finishing (like most of us), I stumbled across a deck of CDVs which I had picked up from a local carboot. CDV, or Carte de Visite, as one could verify throughout the net, is a form of affordable, mass-produced, photographic albumen prints mounted on 2.5 x 4 inches hard card (usually about this size). Most of the CDVs would contain information of the responsible studio produces them and it is a fascinating form of photographic historical collection.

Though they are not rare, by all means they aren’t common either. Though rarities would come in shapes of who the sitters’ are, type of subject (e.g.-images of the dead, popular figure, photographers themselves, etc.), the popularity of the photographer/the studio, and even the appearance and aesthetic decorations of the cards.

Though the quality of this batch isn’t any of the above, but it still fascinates me to peruse and just keep them aside for my own references. Bought them in a bundle, though I was interested in just few, the seller kept insisting that I take them all! It was cheap enough to bother and why not.

Among this pile, I had scanned and selected few to be posted here. All of these CDVs were slightly adjusted (colours, tones) to be as close as the original as the scans ICC profile tends not skim from what I see on screen. These selected CDVs has its own interesting point of views, whcih I like to share on this blog post. Although the quality is much left to be desired, as they were damaged from many wreckless handlings by its previous owner, they are a few interesting pieces nonetheless. These were scanned and the rear design image were placed next to it.

Young lady with white Rose. By Signor G. Musitano, Artist Photographer, 57 South St. Greenwich
Young lady with white Rose. By Signor G. Musitano, Artist Photographer, 57 South St. Greenwich
Moustache gentleman. By W. L. Troxell, 319 Fulton Avenue, Bet. Portland Avenue and Elliot Place, Brooklyn. Note: Damaged by horrible attempt to
Moustache gentleman. By W. L. Troxell, 319 Fulton Avenue, Bet. Portland Avenue and Elliot Place, Brooklyn.
Note: Damaged by horrible attempt to “colour” the moustache and rear portion of the hair
Gentleman with umbrella. By Goswak, Harrow. Note: it is possible that the head braces were hidden underneath the drapery behind him as the folding of it loosely covers its base.
Gentleman with umbrella. By Goswak, Harrow.
Note: it is possible that the head braces were hidden underneath the drapery behind him as the folding of it loosely covers its base.
Gentleman standing. By Mrs Erby, Photographic Cottage, Greenside, Richmond. Note: Headbraces stand meant for sitting stood at the edge of the frame alongside with the tophat, which might belong to this gentleman. Plus it is not common to find a lady photographer and her studio.
Gentleman standing. By Mrs Erby, Photographic Cottage, Greenside, Richmond.
Note: Headbraces stand meant for sitting stood at the edge of the frame alongside with the tophat, which might belong to this gentleman. Plus it is not common to find a lady photographer and her studio.
Lady with keys. By E. Goshawk, Harrow Note: Another beautiful image by Goshawk, which I had begun to note for standing subject, it is preferred if they are crutched by furniture to help them to keep still besides the head braces.
Lady with keys. By E. Goshawk, Harrow
Note: Another beautiful image by Goshawk, which I had begun to note for standing subject, it is preferred if they are crutched by furniture to help them to keep still besides the head braces.
Sitting Lady. By Ludw Shultz, Greenwich
Sitting Lady. By Ludw Shultz, Greenwich
Lady with a bag. Card note: Photographers in h.r.h. The Prince of Wales. Under the Patronage of her majesty. The London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company. 54 Cheapside. And At No Regent Street. Sole photographers to the international Exhibition 1862. Note: A fantastic composure of the subject, with one glove off and on the table was a book and a bag, which I am guessing it is a doctor's bag, which is a treat of a find as it is one of rare profession for ladies in the past, and certainly a rare find in historical photographic images.
Lady with a bag. Card note: Photographers in h.r.h. The Prince of Wales. Under the Patronage of her majesty. The London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company. 54 Cheapside. And At 11o Regent Street. Sole photographers to the international Exhibition 1862.
Note: A fantastic composure of the subject, with one glove off and on the table was a book and a bag, which I am guessing it is a doctor’s bag, which is a treat of a find as it is one of rare profession for ladies in the past, and certainly a rare find in historical photographic images.
A gentleman. Note behind: Hahlesburg (?) Note: A CDV which almost fooled me as it seemed to be of a drawing, or etching of the likeness of the person. See following image for the close-up.
A gentleman. Note behind: Hahlesburg (?)
Note: A CDV which almost fooled me as it seemed to be of a drawing, or etching of the likeness of the person. See following image for the close-up.
Close up of the CDV
Close up of the CDV
A Young Man. By A. Wren, Mitchell Street, Sandhurst. Notes scribbled in blue ink on the sides of the rear part of CDV - Accept it as a birthday present. 19 years of age to night. James Hatton Stevenson.
A Young Man. By A. Wren, Mitchell Street, Sandhurst.
Notes scribbled in blue ink on the sides of the rear part of CDV – Accept it as a birthday present. 19 years of age to night. James Hatton Stevenson. 8hand tinted colour of his tie and attempt to colour a flower on his lapel
A gentleman with remnant of two giant creature's toes (?). By A & E Seeley. Greville Road, Richmond S.W. Not: It is unknown if this were a tool, contraption of a profession, or a cast of parts from creature's foot, which at the edge seems like nails.
A gentleman with remnant of two giant creature’s toes (?).
By A & E Seeley. Greville Road, Richmond S.W.
Not: It is unknown if this were a tool, contraption of a profession, or a cast of parts from creature’s foot, which at the edge seems like nails.
Child on a chair. By R. Harman, High Street Depford. Note scribbled: Year and Nine months. Milo F.L. Fern
Child on a chair. By R. Harman, High Street Depford.
Note scribbled: Year and Nine months. Miss F.L. Fenn (ed.)

Update: It was brought up by Helena Cowell on the story of this image. The child standing on the chair was registered in the 1881 UK census as Fanny Louisa Fenn (born 25th June 1865, baptised 23rd July 1865 at St Paul, Kent), with her parents Frederick William Fenn (a carpenter by professsion), and mother, Sarah Eliza.

Helena had pointed out the reference and the details could be retrieved on ancestry.co.uk (FHL film No. 384871, 384872). A fantastic detective work by Helena Cowell and much appreciated on the details. In hope if any of descendants of the family have any further details which could enlighten further story of this image, you are most welcome to be in touch.

A young family (hand tinted). By J. Wright, Sturt Street, Ballaarat
A young family (hand tinted). By J. Wright, Sturt Street, Ballaarat
Lady with bible. By Ludw Schultz. Note: Another fantastic image from the same studio with same background drop and tack sharp focus on the subject and tonal qualities.
Lady with bible. By Ludw Schultz.
Note: Another fantastic image from the same studio with same background drop and tack sharp focus on the subject and tonal qualities.
Bearded Gentleman (hand tinted). By Fred C. Jones, 146 Oxford Street, London. Note: This is an interesting piece of CDV colouring, though not of high pristine quality, but nonetheless the emulation similar to painting as it was tinted entirely. And the addition to it being printed in oval shape and rough edges, which was likely meant to be framed.
Bearded Gentleman (hand tinted). By Fred C. Jones, 146 Oxford Street, London.
Note: This is an interesting piece of CDV colouring, though not of high pristine quality, but nonetheless the emulation similar to painting as it was tinted entirely. And the addition to it being printed in oval shape and rough edges, which was likely meant to be framed.
Lady with brooch. By Fred C. Jones. Note: Coming from the same studio, this was poorly tinted as it had almost misshapen the lips, though it was generally meant to be just lightly tinted, giving a bit of life to the subject.
Lady with brooch. By Fred C. Jones.
Note: Coming from the same studio, this was poorly tinted as it had almost misshapen the lips, though it was generally meant to be just lightly tinted, giving a bit of life to the subject.

Though there are more stacks of CDVs which I might be able to scan and share it within this blog space, these were some of fascinating findings which is held differently in person compared to on screen.

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