My current filter stand is a simple, bashed in plywood with a small hole at the to hold the filter funnel. Running through many filtering sessions from developers, collodion, and various other filtrations, I admit, it is a contraption which I realised that I had abused it for the past few years.

A Workhorse Filter Stand. Still standing strong but badly in need of re-enforcing. Now with an additional crutch. (Note: the blue cast is from the UV lamp blasting my silver batch on the other corner of the table)
A Workhorse Filter Stand. Still standing strong but badly in need of re-enforcing. Now with an additional crutch. (Note: the blue cast is from the UV lamp blasting my silver batch on the other corner of the table)

The top was slanted from all the stress from constant weight, and it was sad to see it needing a crutch to support it! Though the “crutch” bar was used to mark various points on the level of silver bath needed when poured into the tank.

Left over bamboo ply that were cut and shaped with router.
Left over bamboo ply that were cut and shaped with router.

Looking around the workshop, I had found some scraps of bamboo ply, in which these are still my favourite material to use as they are impressively sturdy, which rarely warped, lightweight, and they do look good when oiled.

Bamboo Filter Stand all ready to work with.
Bamboo Filter Stand all ready to work with.

Thinking something simple and basic in design, I had assembled a newer, better looking filter stand.

I had found that using wet & dry sandpaper (for metal), 600 grit, is perfect as grip for the base.

I am still contemplating from using it yet… as I know there’s no escape from spilling / splash of chemicals onto it.

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